The Welsh forests and mountains of Arthurian Legend

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When going to Wales, you definitely can't miss the castles, but the mountainous area of Snowdonia National Park is just as important. Getting safely lost among the lush forests, flower-filled meadows, crumbling stone walls, and tumbling rivers that run through the valleys of these mountains brings to life the legends of King Arthur.

 The famous picturesque bridge in Beddgelert

The famous picturesque bridge in Beddgelert

Firstly, on a trip to the United Kingdom, you cannot miss Wales. Northern Wales is one of my favorite places to explore! If you are a serious hiker you can climb Snowdon, the tallest mountain in Wales. However, there are a lot of other beautiful walks and hikes through forests and over peaks. We stayed in Beddgelert, a quaint little town tucked amongst the high peaks and rivers of Snowdonia. The town is named for the legend of Gelert, a trusty hound who protected Prince Llewelyn's son from a wolf. The prince, upon seeing his dog covered in blood and learning his son was missing, killed the faithful dog before finding his son unharmed next to a dead wolf. The prince buried Gelert south of town and legend says he never smiled again. The origins of the legend are apparently debatable, but the grave remains a huge tourist attraction.  Beddgelert is the perfect place to stay a night or two at a B&B or inn if you are planning on hiking. From Beddgelert you can get to Aberglaslyn Pass, Nant Gwynant, and Snowdon to the north.  When we visited, the town did not impress us with food options, so definitely bring some snacks along. After a long hike the pub grub and beer from the Tanronnen Inn will fill you up.  

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 The sweet bench close to the top of the pass

The sweet bench close to the top of the pass

We walked down the river running south of Beddgelert, up over the Aberglaslyn Pass and down to the lakes of Nant Gwynant. It was magical. Once we reached the lakes, though, we could not find a trail back to Beddgelert so we followed the road back. The whole loop stretched about 7 miles. 

I could walk along the river and in the forests below that pass every day. The forests sing with mystery and make the origins of myths real. 

Does this inspire your marvelous wanderings?

 Looking back from the top of Aberglaslyn Pass

Looking back from the top of Aberglaslyn Pass